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The Homer of Seville

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He Loves to Fly and He D'ohs
The Homer of Seville
Midnight Towboy
The Homer of Seville
Placido Domingo
Episode Number 402
Production Code JABF18
Original Airdate September 30, 2007
Chalkboard Gag The Wall Street Journal Is Better Than Ever
Couch Gag Homer goes through the evolution from prehistory to modern history from unicellular to human. When Homer finally gets to the couch, Marge asks him "Did you bring the milk?" and Homer sighs in exhaustion.
Special Guest Voices Plácido Domingo as himself
Maya Rudolph as Julia
Written By Caroline Omine
Directed By Micheal Polcino

The Homer of Seville is the second episode of Season 19 and first aired on September 30, 2007. It was written by Carolyn Omine, directed by Michael Polcino and guest starred Plácido Domingo as himself and Maya Rudolph as Julia.

SynopsisEdit

After an injury, at the hospital, Homer finds out he can sing very well when he's laid down, so he joins the opera.

Full Story Edit

The episode starts with the Simpsons family escaping church. Marge decides she wants to eat out instead of cooking for herself as usual. After finding out every place has lines, the family goes as far as to break into someone's apparent party. It does not take long for them to realize that they crashed a funeral. Homer volunteers to be a pallbearer, filling in for a man who has twisted his ankle. After falling into an open grave, Homer is sent to the hospital.

While at the hospital, Homer finds out his usual "D'oh!" does not sound as normal. While causing the bed to sit upright and lay flat, Dr. Hibbert notices Homer's diaphragm is safely under his stomach when he is lying down, giving him the ability to sing in an operatic voice that causes newborn babies to cease crying and weak patients to feel strong.

The Homer of Seville (Promo Picture)
While shopping for organs, Mr. Burns overhears Homer and immediately hires him to sing the lead in his production of La bohème. Homer wows the crowd at the Springfield Opera House. Homer becomes an enormous celebrity who consistently receives attention from older aged women. While Homer and Marge are on a date, they soon find themselves running from a mob of his crazed fans. They are soon saved by a person on a motorcycle, which Homer assumes is a man. However at the home, "he" is revealed to be a "she", named Julia. When Marge goes into the kitchen to make tea, Julia strips naked and says she wants to have sex with Homer, and threatens him that she will tell Marge that he attacked her if he tells. Over the next few days, she keeps appearing in sexually suggestive positions. Homer, soon enraged, fires her, but unbeknownst to him, she plots her revenge.

Next morning, Homer finds a poisonous cobra in his cereal box and then, after grabbing it, repeatedly whacks it on the refrigerator causing it to be dazed for the remainder of the morning. Lisa deducts someone is trying to kill Homer. At Homer's next performance, Chief Wiggum goes to general measures, none of which are useful. Julia arrives to shoot Homer with a poisonous blowdart. While Marge saves Homer, the shot fires through a French Horn and back into Julia's neck. Every sniper in the opera house starts shooting at Julia, although all but one miss. She is taken to the hospital, vowing revenge on Marge. Homer gives up opera to work on his new passion: painting.

Behind the LaughterEdit

Reception Edit

The episode had 8.43 million views tuned in.[1] Robert Canning of IGN gave the episode a poor review (4.5/10). He found the plot contrived and found Homer's rendition "If Ever I Would Leave You" unfunny. He did enjoy the episode's opening scenes in the church.[2] Richard Keller of TV squad said, "I thought the episode itself was okay with a few good laughs". He went on to say, "Not only does Castellaneta have a very good professional voice, but he seemed to adapt to all of the Italian opera verses that he needed to sing during the episode."[3]

External links Edit

Citations Edit

  1. The Homer of Seville. Simpsons Channel (2008). Retrieved on 2008-01-28.
  2. Robert Canning. "If Ever I Would Leave You", IGN,. Retrieved on 2007-10-02. 
  3. Keller, Richard (2008). Little Orphan Millie. AOL. Retrieved on 2008-01-29.
Season 18 Season 19 Episodes Season 20
He Loves to Fly and He D'ohsThe Homer of SevilleMidnight TowboyI Don't Wanna Know Why the Caged Bird SingsTreehouse of Horror XVIIILittle Orphan MillieHusbands and KnivesFuneral for a FiendEternal Moonshine of the Simpson MindE. Pluribus WiggumThat '90s ShowLove, Springfieldian StyleThe DebartedDial "N" for NerderSmoke on the DaughterPapa Don't LeechApocalypse CowAny Given SundanceMona Leaves-aAll About Lisa

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